Tag Archive: grant

Setting Automatic Scheduled Downloads Using the Grant Downloader

Grant Instruments’ Grant Downloader application enables users to set up automatic data downloads from Grant Squirrel Series Data Loggers. By configuring any number of profiles, users can quickly retrieve all data straight from their desktop with just one click. In addition, the Downloader application also allows users to schedule logger downloads at desired times and intervals. Read more in our latest Tech Article.

Portable WiFi Dataloggers Record Data Anywhere!

If you need a device to collect data in the field, in the lab, or on the factory floor, CAS DataLoggers can provide your application with Portable WiFi Dataloggers from Grant Instruments. Common measurement values such as Temperature, Humidity, Voltage, Current, Pressure and Force can all be measured and stored. Read more in our latest Product Announcement.

Grant Releases SquirrelView Ver 3.9 Update for Windows 8 and 8.1

For SQ2010, SQ2020 and SQ2040 Squirrel Data Loggers
CHESTERLAND OH—June 12, 2014

Grant Instruments has released the new SquirrelView V3.9 and V5.1a firmware upgrade for the SQ2010, SQ2020 and SQ2040 Squirrel Data Loggers. SQ v 3.9 is updated for Windows 8.0 and 8.1. CAS DataLoggers offers this new update from our Grant Downloads page at http://www.dataloggerinc.com/downloads/grant.php. Read more on our News Item page.

CAS DataLoggers Hires New Application Specialist

Data Loggers For Any Application

Data Loggers For Any Application

CAS DataLoggers is proud to announce we’ve hired an additional Applications Specialist to address an increased sales volume. Tony King comes to CAS DataLoggers as a recent graduate of Ohio State University. We offer customers data logger models from trusted manufacturers including dataTaker, Accsense, T&D, Grant, and many more. Read more on our News Items page.

CAS DataLoggers Survey Gives Away a Free iPad

16GB Wi-Fi iPad Giveaway
CHESTERLAND OH—July 11, 2012

iPadCAS DataLoggers is giving away a FREE 16GB Wi-Fi iPad as part of a short survey being sent out as part of an ongoing initiative to identify its growing customer base best present its cost-effective datalogging and data acquisition solutions. CAS DataLoggers is reaching out to a broad customer base that can really take advantage of its wide range of datalogging products to cut labor costs, save time, and measure at high accuracy. Read more on our General News page.

Connecting a Pressure Sensor to a Grant SQ2010 Data Logger

Grant SQ2010 Portable Universal Input Data Logger

CHESTERLAND OH—October 31, 2011

This article will explain how to connect pressure transducers and data loggers–specifically, transducers with an analog current signal (4-20ma), and the popular Grant Instruments SQ2010 portable universal input dataloggers. Required items for this project include a 2-wire pressure transducer with a 4-20ma signal; a 24V DC power supply, a SQ2010 data logger (with external power supply if you don’t want to use a separate supply for the 4-20ma signal, or don’t want to run it from batteries), and a 10 ohm shunt resistor.

The wiring aspect of this project is fairly easy; most 2-wire pressure transducers have wires that are color-coded red (+) and black (-). If you are using the external 24V power supply, simply connect the red wire of the transducer to the positive of the 24V power supply, then connect the black wire from the transducer and one lead of the 10 ohm shunt resistor to terminal one on block A of the Grant data logger. Now connect the other lead from the shunt resistor as well as the negative of the 24V power supply to terminal 2 of block A. This completes the external power supply wiring.

Completing the wiring using the SQ2010’s own internal excitation is basically the same as above. The red wire from the pressure transducer will go to terminal 1 in block E, while the black wire and one lead of the shunt resistor will still go to terminal 1 on block A. The other lead from the shunt resistor will go into 2 on block A, along with a jumper wire that will go from terminal 2 on block A to terminal 3 on block E. This can only be done when using an AC power supply for the SQ2010 datalogger.

Programming is fairly straightforward here as well: Open Squirrelview and make sure that you have the right model of logger selected in the Squirrelview Assistant. Click on ‘Logger Setup’ and double-click on the ‘Sensor Type’ box that corresponds with where you have wired the sensor (in this case, it will be the first line of Block A). In the ‘Range Selection’ box that comes up, choose ‘Current’ and select 4-20 mA in the ‘Ranges Available’ box. If you need to add scaling, click on the ‘Add/Edit Scaling’ button and use the top and bottom of the full measurement range of your transducer in the ‘as’ boxes in the ‘Display [20 ] as [ ]’ boxes and your engineering units in the ‘Display Units of’ box.

Now click ‘OK’ twice, and give the channel a name. Then from the ‘Squirrel’ drop down menu, choose ‘Send Setup to Squirrel and Arm’ if you wish to begin logging immediately, or ‘Send Setup to Squirrel’ if you wish to begin logging at a later time using the front buttons on the SQ2010.

Check out the Grant SQ2010 product page here.

For further information on the Grant Instruments SQ2010 Portable Universal Input Data Logger, other dataloggers in the highly successful Squirrel family, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

River Flow Monitoring With Remote Communications

Grant’s Portable Universal Input SQ2010 Datalogger

CHESTERLAND OH—October 11th, 2011

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the datalogging solution for a local environmental group monitoring the level of a river against rainfall. The river rose and fell visibly throughout the year and often caused property damage in periods of heavy rain, so a monitoring project was organized to find out just how much it varied and to correlate data based on the amount of rainfall. The group needed to have a data logging solution capable of continuous year-round recording which could be accessed remotely. Owing to the project’s outdoor location, this device would also need to be portable, capable of stand-alone operation, and would also have to be a completely weatherproof system that could survive exposure to conditions on the riverbank.

The environmental group installed a Grant Squirrel SQ2010 Portable Universal Input Data Logger in a weatherproof enclosure fitted with a solar panel to recharge an external battery. Also fitted into the enclosure was a GSM modem kit enabling remote communications with the SQ2010. The enclosure was then placed on the riverbank and connected to sensors measuring temperature, humidity, and pressure. Additionally, a rain gauge was placed adjacent to the enclosure and a depth sensor was installed in the center of the riverbed. The project went underway as the data logger began taking hourly readings of the air and water temperature, humidity, rainfall, river depth and barometric pressure.

The lightweight, battery powered SQ2010 datalogger featured up to 8 analog input channels capable of measuring temperature at a high accuracy of 0.1%, as well as recording humidity, current, voltage, and resistance. In addition, its 8 digital channels could automatically trigger or stop logging, while 2 alarm/relay outputs provided alarm features. The high quality device also featured a built-in 2-line x 40-character LCD display and keypad. World renowned for their compact ruggedness and reliability, Squirrel data loggers could stand up to exposure to harsh weather conditions and keep logging. All readings were recorded to the logger’s 16 MB internal memory, storing up to 1.8 million readings and featuring USB connectivity to a PC for easy downloads as well as optional Ethernet or RS232 connections, the latter chosen for this project to allow connection to modems and other networking devices.

Grant Downloader software was included free and automatically contacted the Grant datalogger at a set time each day to download the data, which was then transferred to a website so that it could be accessed by the project’s users via any PC connected to the Internet. Also included free of charge was the SquirrelView universal software package enabling quick configuration and setup of the datalogger along with fast data downloads and direct export to Excel in real-time or as a CSV file for customizable data analysis. SquirrelView’s user-friendly spreadsheet style setup and flexible data presentation allowed the team to quickly display and analyze real time or historical data as a line graph, bar chart or analog gauge, and the simple communication wizard took the hassle out of working with the GSM modem. Graphical alarm and event identification let users easily identify occurrences around specific analog or digital events, and downloads could be scheduled by date, time or events, saving time when working with the modem or looking for specific data.

The environmental project benefited in numerous ways following installation of the Grant SQ2010 datalogger. The affordable Squirrel device was able to log continuously throughout the project, recording the environmental data from the river with highly precise measurements. One Squirrel data logger was all it took to collect and present all the project’s data in an organized, convenient format as well as provide alarm capabilities. Configuration and setup were quickly performed using the free SquirrelView software, and data collection was simplicity itself thanks to remote access provided by the enclosed GSM kit connected to the logger’s RS232 port, especially ideal given the lack of available land lines in the area. Likewise, downloading and analyzing the data was easily handled using SquirrelView. Throughout the project, the weatherproofed enclosure ensured that the system remained safe for reliable logging even in face of the worst weather. The device’s handheld portability was also a major plus, being about the size of a small notebook. Overall the project’s members found that the SQ2010 was robust, dependable and very easy to use.

Analysis of the project’s data showed that the river began to rise after approximately two hours of rainfall. A very significant amount of rain fell in July 2010–over 2.8 inches (72mm) in under nine hours– and the river rose from its normal level of 9.8 inches (250mm) to over 6ft. (2 meters). Unfortunately by this time, water was now flowing through a few houses!

Check out the Grant SQ2010 datalogger product page here.

For further information on the Grant SQ2010 Portable Universal Input Data Logger, the entire Squirrel family of data loggers, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Updating Firmware For Grant SQ20XX Series

For the Popular Grant Squirrel 20XX Series DataLoggers

CHESTERLAND OH—August 17, 2011

With each new release of Grant’s user-friendly Squirrelview software, there is often also a new firmware release for the bestselling Grant Squirrel 20XX series dataloggers. This quick tutorial shows users step by step how to update the firmware on their Squirrel data loggers.
First plug the SQ20XX data logger into your PC using a USB cable. Make sure the logger is powered, either by an external power supply or by a fresh set of batteries. Launch Squirrelview. The first window you will see is the Squirrelview Assistant.

Click on the ‘Tools’ menu in the Squirrelview Assistant and then choose ‘Diagnostics’. In the ‘Diagnostics’ window, click on the ‘Squirrel’ menu (located next to ‘File’) and choose the ‘Reprogram Logger’ option.
If the line under ‘Please provide location of the logger firmware update files’ is blank, then click on the ‘Browse’ icon (this will be a rectangle with 3 dots) and browse your way to the SQ20XX firmware directory. This directory (providing you haven’t installed it in a custom place) will be ‘c:\Program Files\SquirrelView\Firmware\2020_2040\’newest version\’ in Windows XP, Vista 32-bit and Windows 7 32-bit. In Vista and Windows 7 64-bit versions, it will be ‘c:\Program Files (x86)\SquirrelView\Firmware\2020_2040\’newest version\’

Now make sure that all the components in ‘Components Found’ are checked and click ‘Next’. A progress bar will appear at the bottom of the wizard window indicating the flashing progress of the components. Once it is finished, the wizard window will indicate for you to press ‘Finish’ to finish the process. Go to the ‘Tools’ section in the main menu of the data logger and choose ‘Versions’ to make sure that the ‘Controller’ and ‘Analogue’ firmwares are updated. Check out the Grant Squirrel 20XX series product pages here.

For further information on the Grant Squirrel 20xx family of dataloggers, details on other data logging devices, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com