Tag Archive: remote monitoring

Remote Monitoring a Load Cell on a Crane Hoist

With the dataTaker DT82E Environmental Intelligent Data Logger
CHESTERLAND OH—May 21, 2012

dataTaker DT82E Environmental Intelligent Data LoggerCAS DataLoggers recently provided the remote monitoring solution for a crane servicing company which needed to monitor a load cell located on the hoist of one of its cranes. The servicer also had a need for additional functionality–currently its personnel lacked a device to monitor its equipment, and only learned of problems when a motor or drive suddenly failed—an expensive way to find out about a problem! To meet these requirements, supervisors began looking for an all-in-one system which could continually monitor the load cell and also setup remote monitoring and alarming in the event of developing machine failures, and send all the data to a remote office PC as an accessible dashboard display. Read more on our Equipment Monitoring applications note page.

10 Things to Know Before Purchasing a Data Logger for Remote Monitoring

Fast Data Collection and Retrieval for Remote Applications
CHESTERLAND OH—May 14, 2012

Remote monitoring applicationsRemote monitoring applications in fields such as oil and natural gas extraction, environmental monitoring, and fleet management often require close attention to detail. Users need to accurately record and track several variables including temperature, flow, strain, stress, vibration, and more. Therefore, when purchasing a new data logging solution, it’s crucial to understand the exact capabilities and specifications of the device you need. However, the sheer variety of data loggers and data logging systems can often make it difficult to choose the best model for your application. Read more on our White Paper page.

Earth Ground Fault Remote Alarming & Fault Detection for Power Grids

Earth Ground Fault Remote Alarming & Fault Detection for Power Grids
Infinite BSC-50 Remote Alarming System with Built-in GSM/GPRS Modem

CHESTERLAND OH—January 10, 2012

CAS DataLoggers recently provided the datalogging solution for an electrical utility company which needed to send alarms from remote stations in the event that the local power grid went down, and in other special cases including operational faults and security breaches.

Read the full article here.

CAS Introduces New Ruggedized Ibexis Micro MSP Model

GSM Modem Data Logger for Remote Monitoring in Real-Time

CHESTERLAND OH—November 14, 2011

CAS DataLoggers has teamed up with bestselling manufacturer Ibexis to announce a new ruggedized model of the sophisticated Micro MSP GSM Modem Data Logger. This compact but heavy-duty remote monitoring solution is specifically designed for fuel-consumption monitoring in vehicle fleets and for many other real-time fleet applications. This upgraded version of the Micro MSP has been heavily reinforced with a solid aluminum enclosure which allows it to withstand years of rough handling. This durable data logger is the perfect small Remote Telemetry Unit (RTU) device where I/O monitoring is required but limited installation space is a consideration. For an even greater value, CAS is offering the new Micro MSP at an even lower cost than the base MSP remote system.

The Micro provides a complete solution in a small mains free box–after the quick install, users can start collecting data in real-time from remote field-based sensors, instruments and control systems for immediate viewing live on the Web. This single integrated solution features 4 differential analog inputs as well as digital input/output channels. The Micro MSP also incorporates 2 serial channels and features a removable SD memory card as well as up to 2 sensor power supplies, an antenna and a SIM card.

The new model Micro MSP datalogger is designed to last in the field for at least five years and utilizes ultra-low power management, operating from an internal rechargeable lithium battery and supplemented by solar power or another renewable energy source. The MSP Micro system entirely eliminates the complexity and cost of collecting real-time data from remote field based sensors, instruments and control systems: onsite data is transmitted to the central servers at Ibexis via the logger’s integrated GPRS cellular modem for automatic data transfer and cloud-based data storage and reporting. The data logger uses an optimized and secure protocol which is proven to be both robust and dependable. Sensor data collection, filtering, dispatch, and alerting features all increase data management while decreasing response times.

The new ruggedized Micro MSP solution also comes standard with a wide range of data services and web applications. Included in the monthly data charge are all cellular data charges, sensor data hosting and archives, along with a range of web-based configuration, analysis and reporting applications. The Micro MSP can be remotely configured from the Ibexis website where both live and historic sensor data are available for viewing. Secure web-based applications include tabular and graphical data, charting, maps, SMS and email alerting tools. There are also facilities for data export in a variety of formats including CSV, Excel and XML.

Check out the new Ibexis Micro MSP GSM Modem Data Logger product page here.

For further information on the new ruggedized Ibexis Micro MSP GSM Modem Data Logger, other Ibexis data logging and remote monitoring applications, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Growing Trends In Data Logging Capabilities

Advanced New Dataloggers Increase Communications Options

CHESTERLAND OH—September 28, 2011

Recently the market has seen an increased interest in smaller models of battery-powered data loggers featuring wireless communications interfaces. These convenient systems rely on proprietary wireless protocols to provide the best mix of range and battery life, often lasting a full year or more. Data can be sent to a handheld receiver, PC, or a network-connected collector. Typical applications involve temperature monitoring in refrigerators, freezers, storage areas, and other controlled environments. For example, there is currently a great deal of activity in hospitals for monitoring refrigerated drug and blood storage being driven by the new JHACO regulations for monitoring and reporting. An excellent example of these monitoring products are the Accsense line of wireless temperature, humidity, environmental, and voltage/current dataloggers.

Another rising trend is the market’s move toward building more functionality and intelligence into network-connected data loggers. The newest models of dataloggers offer built-in Ethernet interfaces for easy integration into the network along with FTP and Web servers for enhanced communication. This makes it possible to take advantage of the modern ubiquity of network connections, whether on a desktop in the plant or halfway across the world to make recorded data available to multiple users in real-time. The enhanced local intelligence of data loggers can be taken advantage of in several different ways for improved autonomous logging and reduced cost of operation. Local and remote alarming is certainly a major benefit: by utilizing programmable limits, local logic and math capabilities and digital outputs, sophisticated alarm algorithms can be programmed into the new data loggers. This allows the logger to activate a local sound or light alarm or other warning indicator or a remote alarm via pop-up window, email, or SMS message. Adaptive sampling is another intelligent logger advantage: often huge volumes of “normal” data are being collected when in fact the user is only interested in looking at anomalies. Intelligent data loggers give these users the ability to continuously monitor the desired parameters, but only record data when the values go outside of their expected range. This can greatly reduce the cost of analyzing and reporting exceptions. Intelligent loggers can also change their sample rate and which inputs are measured dynamically, allowing the user to get much more detailed information when abnormal events occur. Statistical data reduction provides a similar function: much like adaptive sampling, this allows the data logger to summarize a large volume of data into a few key pieces of information. Intelligent data loggers can provide statistics such as minimum and maximum over a user-set period of time as well as histograms and even rainflow analysis to further reduce the effort and cost of data collection.

Increasingly, solutions providers are being asked to provide more loggers equipped with cellular communication for use in monitoring remote or mobile sites. Innovative enhancements to cellular modems, both CDMA and GSM–in particular the addition of IP stacks–make it possible to access a logger in the field via a regular Ethernet address from a nearby PC in the field or by desktop. State-of the-art modems can make this data transmission almost completely transparent. The only drawbacks are that there is an additional monthly cost for the cellular account, and the initial configuration can be confusing for some users.

One particular application where cellular communication is extensively being used is in vehicle monitoring. With recent changes in EPA regulations covering emissions from industrial diesel engines, we have had many requests for datalogging systems to monitor emissions control systems on buses, trucks, construction equipment, and even snow-cats. Loggers are outfitted to monitor the exhaust stream and engine performance parameters with cellular modems allowing data to be collected from the vehicle while it is in the field, eliminating the need to actually travel to the equipment to retrieve the data.

Even more storage and communications options exist, such as USB; many new loggers incorporate USB communications interfaces for configuration and data download. Support for removable storage media is also available in the form of slots for USB memory sticks or SD/MMC card slots. This allows the user to expand the storage space of the logger and to rapidly retrieve stored data by simply swapping out the card. Some loggers even allow remote programming via these cards to update loggers in the field. Another technology is provided by SDI-12, a standard, low-speed serial bus that is used on environmental sensors and weather stations. New loggers provide 1 or more SDI-12 channels to allow easy data collection from these devices. Of course, CANbus is also available for vehicle applications, and a good solutions provider will offer a datalogger, such as the Influx Rebel xt, that can take advantage of a CANbus gateway to collect operating data via the standard OBD-II or J1939 network in most newer vehicles. Modbus communications further increase users’ options using either serial or Modbus TCP, allowing the data logger to exchange information with other equipment, whether using a PLC or HMI. Wi-Fi wireless communications are especially valuable if the datalogger is going to be used in multiple locations in a facility. Eliminating the need for a wired connection back to the user’s PC allows the logger to be quickly relocated from one piece of equipment or room to another. It also facilitates the collection of data from moving equipment. Finally, wireless Ethernet is being used as an alternative method to collect data such as temperature and humidity from multiple sites within a facility when it’s not practical or expensive to string cables. Nowadays, some data loggers utilize Bluetooth communications to downloaded stored data, including AEMC’s ML 914 AC Current Data Logger. The low-power advantages of Bluetooth make it practical to use with battery-operated loggers where they will be located in areas that are difficult to access, inside a piece of equipment, or off the ground, although the limited range restricts the number of applications where it can be used.

For further information on intelligent data loggers, wireless dataloggers, devices featuring inbuilt cellular communications and/or Bluetooth communications, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

CAS Announces New Ruggedized Ibexis Micro MSP Model

GSM Modem Data Logger for Remote Monitoring

CHESTERLAND OH—August 9, 2011

CAS DataLoggers has partnered with popular manufacturer Ibexis to announce a new ruggedized model of the Micro MSP GSM Modem Data Logger, a compact remote monitoring solution specifically designed for fuel-consumption monitoring in vehicle fleets and other real-time fleet applications. The new model Micro MSP has been heavily reinforced with an aluminum enclosure allowing it to withstand just about any rough handling. This data logger is the perfect small Remote Telemetry Unit (RTU) device where I/O monitoring is required but limited installation space is a consideration. Additionally, the new Micro MSP is currently being offered at a lower cost than the base MSP remote system. The Micro provides a complete solution in a small mains free box–after a quick install, users can start collecting real-time data from remote field-based sensors, instruments and control systems for immediate viewing live on the Web.

The new model Micro MSP data logger is designed to last in the field for at least five years and utilizes ultra-low power management, operating from an internal rechargeable lithium battery and supplemented by solar power or another renewable energy source. Data is transmitted from onsite to the Ibexis central servers via the integrated GPRS cellular modem for automatic data transfer and cloud-based data storage and reporting. The data logger uses an optimized and secure protocol which is proven to be both robust and reliable. The MSP Micro system entirely eliminates the complexity and cost of collecting real-time data from remote field based sensors, instruments and control systems. Sensor data collection, filtering, dispatch and alerting features increase data management while decreasing response times.

This single integrated solution features 4 differential analog inputs as well as digital input/output channels. The Micro MSP also incorporates 2 serial channels and features a removable SD memory card as well as up to 2 sensor power supplies, an antenna and a SIM card.

The new Micro MSP solution also includes a range of data services and web applications. Included in the monthly data charge are all cellular data charges, sensor data hosting and archives along with a range of web-based configuration, analysis and reporting applications. The micro MSP can be remotely configured from the Ibexis website where both live and historic sensor data are available for viewing. Secure web-based applications include tabular and graphical data, charting, maps, SMS and email alerting tools. There are also facilities for data export in a variety of formats including CSV, Excel and XML.

For further information on the new ruggedized Ibexis Micro MSP GSM Modem Data Logger, other Ibexis data logging and remote monitoring applications, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

Performance Design Verification in Automotive A/C

CHESTERLAND OH—July 26, 2011

Malaysian automobile manufacturer Proton needed to test the air conditioning performance of its newly developed A/C system installed in their new Proton Persona 1.6 M-Line test car. During these rigorous tests, air conditioning performance was confirmed under several different test patterns measuring such factors as ambient temperatures and air pressure. Some of these tests were conducted in a specialized climactic test chamber and others on test courses or in special conditions. For example, cool down performance measured how effectively the newly-designed system could cool the car’s cabin from extremely hot conditions including parking in the sun on a hot day. Idling performance tests checked the air conditioning unit’s performance while the car was idling. Traffic jam tests checked the A/C unit’s effectiveness on the test course while the car was driven during heavy traffic conditions. Other tests such as engine cooling, high-speed runs and hill climbing were scheduled to contribute enough data to give engineers a complete picture of the A/C system’s effectiveness. Proton’s automotive engineers began searching for a flexible data logging solution for use in test setups to measure the temperature of every point on the test car to verify the effectiveness of the air conditioner’s performance and ensure that it worked within design requirements. A solution was also needed to measure the pressure of the air conditioning system cycle, the blower, radiator fan, compressor, and magnetic clutch voltage. Since frequent access to the logger wasn’t practical, the required device had to be a remote solution and needed a modem to access data on demand and send results via FTP and email to automotive plant management.

Proton engineers installed a dataTaker DT80M Intelligent Universal Input Data Logger inside the booth of the Persona test vehicle. The DT80M was then interfaced with 4 dataTaker CEM 20 Expansion Modules to expand the data logger’s universal channel capacity by 80 to accommodate the 128 universal thermocouple inputs needed for the tests. Each CEM20 connected to one analog channel of the data logger. The lightweight DT80M featured 12 flexible digital channels and 8 bi-directional digital channels as well as 4 SDI-12 channels and a serial ‘smart sensor’ channel. 4 high-speed counter inputs connected the DT80M to most data measurement sources and sensors including SDI-12 and Modbus. The stand-alone data logger measured most types of thermocouples to capture a broad sensor range.
The tests also required the use of the logger’s real-time data acquisition and communications capabilities, including the inbuilt 2G/3G cellular modem. During each test, the DT80M recorded temperature levels from every point of the test car, and was also used to capture other readings from the A/C system itself, including voltage, current, 4-20mA loops, resistance, bridges, strain gauges, and frequency. Integrated high and low pressure measurement based on strain measurement was performed using the appropriate sensor, while integrated engine speed pulse measurement (rpm) was done using the DT80M’s pulse count. The logger featured a built-in LCD display and 5 to 15 universal analog sensor channels recording across a ± 30Vdc input measurement range at 18-bit resolution. The logger operated at a broad temperature range of -45°C to 70°C (-49°F to 158°F). All measurements were stored on the data logger’s memory, holding up to 10,000,000 stored data points.

The DT80M data logger and its CEM expansion modules made for compact and low-power solutions in the small space of the test car, and their robust construction protected them against frequent jostling on the test course. Additionally, the DT80M’s sophisticated communications allowed connections to a PC from the test car either locally, remotely, or over the Internet using its Ethernet and USB ports. Test engineers set the modem’s automatic data delivery features to automatically email all recorded data to a specified inbox every day, with other schedules possible. The DT80M’s USB memory stick data collection further increased data accessibility.

The dataTaker logger’s user-friendly dEX software enabled quick setup and configuration directly in a web browser, and also performed live data analysis and post-treatment functions. Logged data could be remotely accessed by plant management and the software also allowed users to view the real-time data as mimics or charts in a Windows-Explorer-style interface. The logger’s internal modem came predominantly preconfigured enabling a rapid start to the project, and dEX also enabled remote reconfiguration over the Internet. After the completion of each test, a full report was then filed to management. In this role, the DT80M logger transmitted test result data and alarm messages to plant management PCs, emails, and mobile phones via the built-in cellular modem’s FTP and email SMS messaging.

The Proton plant’s test program immediately benefitted from installing the dataTaker DT80M data logger and its CEM20 expansion modules in several key ways. The DT80M accepted most types of thermocouples, and the CEM20 provided a convenient method of expanding the DT80M’s channels. Each channel of the CEM20 could be used for two isolated inputs or three common reference inputs, forming a very cost-effective solution to carry out the many data acquisition tests. Most importantly, the flexible DT80M handled all the different types of logging needed, monitoring air pressure, ambient temperature, voltage, and strain and pulse measurements. The data logger also served as a total remote monitoring solution, giving plant management the test report data they needed on demand through FTP and SMS messaging. The logger’s dEX software was included free of charge and suited both novice and experienced users in configuring and accessing its data. Finally, as an option for larger tests, a 5th CEM module could be added for the maximum of 300 analog inputs if required. View the DT80M’s product page at http://dataloggerinc.com/products/DT80M_Intelligent_Universal_Input_Data_Logger/193/ and the CEM’s page at http://dataloggerinc.com/products/dataTaker_CEM20_20_Channel_Expansion_Module/8/

For further information on temperature monitoring solutions, remote monitoring solutions, strain measurement, data acquisition and control, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:
CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com

CAS Announces New RTR Wireless 500 series from T&D

Measure, Message, and Monitor With Wireless Data Logging Systems
CHESTERLAND OH—July 26, 2011

CAS Dataloggers has partnered with T&D to announce the new RTR-500 Series Wireless Data Logging Systems, ideal for use in transportation and anywhere traditional LAN networks are not available. With the RTR-500GSM Data Collector, these low-cost remote monitoring solutions can automatically send data and alarms via cellular phone networks for remote or in-vehicle data collection. Users can now process and manage critical data anytime from anywhere using the built-in wireless communication capability. These rugged systems consist of data collectors and data loggers for use across many applications, including transportation and warehousing, food processing and storage, industrial processing and manufacturing, and agriculture.

The RTR-500 Series offers rugged, compact, weatherproof loggers designed for operation in harsh environments with models for temperature, humidity, voltage, current and event counting. The loggers communicate with a variety of data collectors including handheld, USB, Ethernet and cellular versions. Additionally, these data loggers offer alarming plus email, FTP and web interfaces to view and save current readings and recorded data, present them in graph display or export to other programs. Software is included with the base units across the 500 Series free of charge.

These wireless data loggers act as remote units to measure and record data and are registered to the base stations which wirelessly collect their current readings at set intervals and monitor them for measurement alarm warnings. Remote units provide temperature measurement ranges as broad as the RTR-505TC model’s -199°C to 1700°C (-326°F to 3092°F) and offer support for many different thermocouple and RTD sensor types. Full downloads of captured recordings only take about 2 minutes. The wireless data logger units can transmit data up to 500 ft. away from their base stations when unobstructed indoors, and this range can be extended by simply registering an RTR-500 base station as a Repeater to relay communication between a remote unit and base unit. The 500 series data loggers are available in 9 different models to match specific measurement items and ranges, and an array of optional sensors is also offered to further enhance the series’ capabilities.

The flexible 500 Series also features more specialized data collectors such as the RTR-500GSM Mobile Base Station with built-in GSM Modem, equipped with GSM cellular phone network capabilities. The station uses SMS messaging to send warning report mails, guaranteeing that owners always stay on top of critical changes. The RTR-500GSM can also periodically and automatically download the data from its remote units. The RTR-500DC Handheld Data Collector travels with its owner to wirelessly collect and check data from remote units, displaying readings in graph on the built-in display without need for a nearby PC. View the product page at: http://dataloggerinc.com/manufacturers/RTR500_Wireless_Series/45/

For further information on wireless monitoring solutions, temperature monitoring for cold chain and transport applications, facilities monitoring and alarming, data logging and remote monitoring or data acquisition and control applications, contact a CAS Data Logger Applications Analyst at (800) 956-4437 or visit the website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.

Contact Information:

CAS DataLoggers, Inc.
12628 Chillicothe Road
Chesterland, Ohio 44026
(440) 729-2570
(800) 956-4437
sales@dataloggerinc.com
http://www.dataloggerinc.com